Gleason Score

Gleason Score

one Gleason score is a numerical grade assigned to a prostate cancer after it has been evaluated by a pathologist under a microscope in the lab. Gleason score is used to calculate basic information about cancer to determine how serious it is and develop a treatment plan. numerous other details about cancer is included in the pathology report so that the medical team has a complete picture of the situation.
Gleason scale, named after the doctor Donald Gleason, was developed in the 1960s, and it uses cell looks alone to grade the cancer. The scale runs from one, well differentiated cells suggesting a slow growth cancer or a normal prostate, the five poor differentiated cells suggesting that the cancer is aggressive. Stages one and two on the scale are rare, because prostate cancer is usually not identified until at least a part has come to a scale stage of three or four.
the lower the Gleason score, the better the prognosis. in some cases, a doctor may decide that the cancer grows so slowly that treatment may not be immediately necessary, with focus on monitoring the patient for signs of change. a high Gleason score, for example, nine indicates that the cancer is aggressive and grows rapidly, and that the treatment must be decisive and equally aggressive.
Gleason score alone can not be used to develop a treatment plan or to make decisions about how to treat the cancer. There are a number of factors for the medical team and patient to consider when discussing treatment options. some with a high Gleason score already dying from another state, for example may choose to reject treatment, provided that it would not add much additional quality of life, and that strains of treatment can be very unpleasant.

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