Raisin Nutrition Information

Raisin Nutrition Information

The US Department of Agriculture’s food pyramid recommends seven to nine servings of fruits and vegetables per day and raisins can be a cute way to meet your nutritional needs. Natural, tasty and nutritious raisins make a tasty snack or addition to your favorite recipes
Nature’s Snack
Raisins are seedless grapes preserved naturally through sun-drying or heated dehydration. These delicious fruits contain no saturated fat, no trans fat and no cholesterol. Raisins are almost sodium-free, promote a healthy heart and a strong circulatory system. Grapes taste sweeter as raisins, but a quarter cup of raisins contains only 130 calories. One serving of healthy raisins adds 2 percent of the recommended daily value of calcium and 6 percent of the recommended daily value of iron.
Vitamins and minerals in Raisins
Nutritious raisins are loaded with B vitamins like B6, thiamin, riboflavin and niacin — all of which benefit nerve health — and vitamin K, which promotes blood clotting. Raisins are rich in vitamin C, a natural immune system booster. Raisins contain large minerals that benefit your body systems: bone building calcium, magnesium and phosphorus, blood building iron and potassium, the body’s muscles and nerve regulator. Raisins contain “trace” minerals, too. Small amounts of these elements go a long way in maintaining health. Manganese aids healing and metabolic processes. Copper rebuild connective tissue, produces blood hemoglobin and strengthens skeletal system.
Other Health Benefits
Grapes and raisins contain antioxidants that fight cancer and age-related diseases. A daily, quarter-cup serving of raisins contributes about 9 per cent of 20 to 35 grams of dietary fiber recommended for digestive health. Suggests that a high-fiber diet low in fat can help prevent colon cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer and gallbladder disease.
raisin Research
A study by Dr. Christine Wu of the University of Illinois College of Dentistry indicated that raisins reduced gum disease and tooth decay by neutralizing harmful oral bacteria.
Cornell University researcher, Dr. Andrew Dannenberg, showed that catechin, an antioxidant in raisins, reduced intestinal tumors in mice.
Several studies measuring the effectiveness of raisins as energy-food found that fatigue decreased and endurance increased in raisin consumers.
Practical and Storage of Raisins
Raisins come in large boxes or practical, snack-sized packs. Store fruit in a cool, dry place and make sure to cool after opening. Raisins have a long shelf life — up to two years in the refrigerator and longer if frozen.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *