What Is The Meaning Of Food Labels?

What Is The Meaning Of Food Labels?

Food labels have been around a while, and almost all packaged products have one. Without close inspection, they look about the same. However, by paying attention to the information on those labels, consumers ensure that they and their families eat the right amounts of nutrients. They can also avoid overeating, avoid unhealthy foods and keep known allergens away from themselves and their families
History
In 1990 Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act, which called for the nutrition labels set of products today. The introduction of the labels signaled the beginning of standardized information, including portion size. By 2006, demanded Food and Drug Administration the amount of trans fats in foods to be included on labels. The following year, Food Allergy Labeling and Consumer Protection Act was passed so that common allergens are listed on labels.
healthy Nutrients
By studying food labels, you can learn what to eat to get good nutrition. For example, a food label says not only what vitamins product contains, but also the percentage of the daily requirement of vitamins in a serving, and you can learn from the label that a cup of macaroni and cheese provides 20 percent of the calcium needed for a day. And the label also states that five grams of protein is in the serving.
Less healthy ingredients
If you’re watching your weight, check the food label for the number of calories in a serving of a product. But calories alone will not indicate good or poor nutrition, avoid fat, especially everything labeled “trans fat.” Two other ingredients that can cause health problems are sugar and sodium. The food label is the number of milligrams of sodium and the percentage of the daily sodium intake in serving, and the amount of sugar listed in grams. Individuals that restricts the intake of carbohydrates may find that the amount listed in grams as well.
allergens
For people who need to manage their exposure to foods that cause allergic reactions, today’s food labels make a difference. For example, the number of serious reactions caused by peanuts have been greatly reduced because manufacturers must provide the presence of peanuts in the product, and they must also provide for the same machines used in making a particular product has also been used for peanut products. are other allergens that must be identified on labels other nuts, soybeans, milk, eggs and fish, including shellfish.
warnings
Although great strides have been made to protect and inform consumers through food labels, many concerns remain. The terminology is often open to interpretation. For example, the words “low fat” on a product that ensures a low amount of healthy fat, it may be low in fat, but fat can be trans-fatty acids. Serving size is a common source of controversy because the manufacturer idea of ​​an average serving, often adjusted for listing of various nutrients, may be far from the consumer normally eat. Also tagged regulation of products “hormone-free” are insufficient.

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