Low Cholesterol And Low Trans Fat Diets

Low Cholesterol And Low Trans Fat Diets

Trans fat and cholesterol take a toll on the heart and other body systems. They build up and can cause blockages that may lead to a heart attack. Any healthy diet should avoid trans fats and cholesterol to maintain a strong heart. Yet, these drugs often found in foods where you would not expect
Check Label
As the harmful effects of trans fats are more known, food manufacturers also developed resources to hide trans fat as an ingredient. Check the ingredients, not just the nutritional information. Everything listed as “partially hydrogenated” or “fat” is actually trans fats. If you find these names in the first three ingredients, leave the product on the shelf. Another way of detecting hidden trans fat is to extract from saturated fat and unsaturated fat amount from the total fat. If they do not add up, contains an element likely trans fat.
Avoid baked goods, Fast Food, and Canned Soup
Finished cookies, cakes and donuts are often filled with trans fats. Moreover, according to Consumer Reports, several companies have moved away from trans fats as Dunkin Donuts, Krispy Kreme, Starbucks and Tim Horton has returned to saturated fats, which contain cholesterol. If you crave cake, bake it at home with heart healthy ingredients like olive oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, and heart healthy spreads such as Benecol, Promise Activ, or Smart Balance. Avoid baking mixes and ready-to-bake biscuits, is because many of these also made with trans fats. Furthermore, canned soups usually contain trans fats, and fast food can be a carrier of both trans fat and cholesterol. Remember, many fast food chains that advertise “no trans fat” has converted into sources of saturated fat. If in doubt, call the company and ask what products they use for cooking. Vegetable oil, shortening, butter, corn oil, lard and many margarines not belong in a low-cholesterol diet.
Avoid foods with high cholesterol
Red meat, egg yolk, shrimp and milk all contain high levels of cholesterol. Instead of buying these products, buy non-fat milk, lean meats such as fish, eggs and substitutes. Cook with canola oil, olive oil, or peanut oil instead of butter or vegetable oil.
Dietary fiber and Omega-3s
Increased dietary fiber in your diet can help reduce cholesterol. Eat whole grains such as oatmeal and fresh vegetables such as spinach. Many pasta and bread are also made with whole grains. Omega-3s may also help. Try to eat healthy fish like salmon or include flaxseed, which is a major source of both fiber and omega-3s into your diet. Ground flaxseed itself can be used to reduce the amount of oil required in almost all baking recipe.

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