Types Of Food Labels

Types Of Food Labels

Food labels are designed by manufacturers to appeal to consumers, but they also serve an important function: to provide information on ingredients and nutritional content of the food product. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) monitors the content of food labels for accuracy. Nutrition Labeling and Education Act (NLEA) requires that all foods have standardized nutritional labeling
Necessary Information for Packaged Foods The NLEA became law in 1990. It requires all packaged foods provide the name and address of the food’s manufacturer, weight or number of food and nutrition facts for food. It NLEA applies to all foods except meat, poultry, eggs, cooked food or food sold in bulk.
Nutrition Facts Label
The Nutrition Facts Label is the label with the most information for consumers. The first line of this label indicates the serving size. The nutritional information that follows is based on this specific serving size. The next line shows the total calories, and the amount of calories are from fat. The following lines contain the food’s total fat content (including a breakout of saturated and trans fats), cholesterol and sodium. Carbohydrates, fiber, sugar, vitamins and minerals are listed next. The percentage of the daily value for each nutrient, based on a 2,000 calorie diet, are listed on the right side of the label. Footer at the bottom of the label, the FDA recommended dietary guidelines. If the food label is very small, this footnote shortened.
Food labels for fish and raw fruits and vegetables
Provides nutritional labels for these foods is voluntary. Instead of a label, FDA provides downloadable posters for sellers to display. There are separate posters for fruits, vegetables and fish, and every poster has nutritional information for the 20 most foods in that category.
Food labels and health claims
Under NLEA, regulates FDA health claims that manufacturers can use the front-of-package food labels. The health claims must be supported by scientific research and approved by the FDA. Moreover, certain health claims and descriptive terms to meet a standard definition. For example, a food that has a “low fat” label has 3 grams of fat or less per serving, and a food labeled “low calorie” must have 40 calories or less per serving.
Warning
Food labels are not foolproof. For example, manufacturers are not required to list the amount of caffeine contained in a food product. Many foods and beverages, such as prepared food and alcohol, are not required to have a food label. Furthermore, portion sizes for some foods may not be realistic.

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