Diet For Diabetics

Diet For Diabetics

Discovering that you have diabetes can be devastating. You have questions about the monitoring of blood glucose, medication, and what foods you should eat. Diet for diabetics is not much different from a diet of healthy eating. The greatest danger is that carbohydrate intake. Diabetics must count carbohydrates because they turn to sugar or glucose quickly causing high blood sugar levels. Fat intake is important too, because it affects the risk of coronary heart disease. Ask your dietitian for a personalized diet plan.
carbohydrates
Carbohydrates turn to sugar or glucose within two hours of taking them. Your body uses sugar for energy. Carbohydrates are measured in grams. One serving of carbohydrate is 15 grams. Some typical one-serving records is a small piece of fruit, a sandwich, a small potato, half a cup of starchy vegetables or a third of a cup of rice. Your dietitian will determine how many carbs you can have for a meal. The usual amount is 45-60 grams, depending on gender, age and weight. Most dietitians suggest you have 15 grams, or one serving, of carbohydrate for a snack. A good choice is three copper popcorn, which is 15 grams.
protein
Protein is essential for body building and body repair. Diabetics, but must see the fat content of some proteins. Dietitians suggest that diabetics consume no more than six grams of protein every day. A piece of meat that is three grams equals the size of a deck. A hot dog is one ounce. A small hamburger is three grams. An ounce of cheese is the size of your thumb. Stick to lean cuts of meat. Limit red meat to eat it once a day and no more than three times a week. Dairy products contain protein, too. Stick to low-fat or nonfat dairy products.
Vegetables and fruits
starchy vegetables like corn, peas, winter squash and potatoes are considered carbohydrates, so they must be monitored. Non-starchy vegetables are good choices. One cup of carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, summer squash or green beans contain only five grams of carbohydrates. Fruits are important, but choose whole fruits over juice. A small fruit equals a serving of carbohydrates, but a four ounce glass of juice is also a serving. The fruit is a better choice because it takes longer to digest, slowing down the speed of carbohydrate turns into sugar. Juice is a good choice if you have a sugar low. For a balanced diet, consider three to five servings of fruit and vegetables every day.

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