Nuclear Cataract

Nuclear Cataract

a nuclear cataract is an eye condition characterized by a centralized clouding of the lens that interferes with vision. Risk factors for this form of cataract development include advanced age, some existing medical conditions and lifestyle factors. treatment for a nuclear cataract generally involves surgery to replace the affected lens. as with any invasive medical procedure, not carrying cataract surgery risks of complications, including excessive bleeding and infection.
distinctive vision changes that occur with nuclear cataract development will generally request a visit to the ophthalmologist. a diagnosis of a nuclear cataract will usually be done by administering a vision acuity test and other diagnostic exams. vision acuity test involves reading lines from a chart of letters arranged in varying font sizes, usually from the largest at the top of the chart to the smallest at the bottom. diagnostic exams may involve the use of retinal and slit-lamp tests to assess the condition of the inner eye, including the lens, retina and cornea.
people who develop a nuclear cataract will generally notice subtle vision changes over time. cataract will usually lead to myopia that worsens and causes the lens to adopt a yellowish tint. a vision becomes more impaired, he or she makes a persistent fog or experience double vision. progressive lens discoloration generally occurs as cataracts worsen, which may further impair one’s vision. people with chronic conditions, such as diabetes, or those who are overweight, smoke or are considered to have an increased chance of developing cataracts.
treatment for a nuclear cataract involves surgical removal of the affected lens and implantation of a replacement lens. performed on an outpatient basis under local anesthesia, cataract surgery is usually reserved for people with vision have been considerably weakened. those undergoing surgery can usually return to daily activities without restriction within a few days.
if existing eye or health problems prevent implantation of a replacement lens, can correct vision is achieved with the use of contacts or glasses. individuals can opt out of surgery if their condition has not significantly impaired their daily activities. those diagnosed with a nuclear cataract not pursue surgery is usually recommended to have annual check-ups with an ophthalmologist their to track any changes in vision or cataracts advancement.

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