Monocular Cue

Monocular Cue

one monocular cue is a visual cue for depth perception requiring only one eye. people with vision loss in one eye can still rely on these cues to navigate in the world, although their depth perception will be compromised. Some examples include motion parallax, interposition, and linear perspective. many of these cues can be seen in works of art, where artists rely on visual tricks to add depth and texture to the visual scenes that viewers feel like they are looking at a three-dimensional environment.
linear perspective, tend to remove lines to appear converge, is an important monocular cue for depth perception. the location of objects relative to these lines can be judged as well. the apparent convergence of train tracks on the horizon is an example. motion parallax, the tendency of distant objects to move more slowly when people are moving, is another of the monocular cues people use to determine the location of objects in the environment. a person on a train could see a distant mountain for several minutes or hours, while a power pole whizzes by in seconds. that person know that the mountains are farther away.
other monocular cues include texture gradient, where the textures look more detailed and accurate when they are closer together with atmospheric perspective. distant objects may appear fuzzy, pale, or otherwise different because of atmospheric disturbances such as dust, and these visual disturbances may give clues about the distance objects interposition is another monocular cue. eyes assume that if an object overlaps another, the overlapping object further away
each monocular cue can help. brain interprets the image projected on the retina. Although the world is three-dimensional, your eyes actually see in two dimensions, and the brain is dependent on visual cues to provide three-dimensional feedback. Additional depth perception cues binoculars, requires both eyes to fix the position of objects in the environment.

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