Causes Too Much Potassium

Causes Too Much Potassium

Potassium is an electrolyte mineral that helps to maintain fluid and electrical balances in the body. Most of the time, the potassium in the tissues, not in the blood (at least not in large amounts). Hyperkalemia occurs if blood tests show high levels of potassium in the blood, depending on the cause, it may be cause for concern. Symptoms of hyperkalemia include headache, nausea, arrhythmias, muscle weakness and fatigue. While uncommon, patients who experience such symptoms, seek medical advice immediately
Nutrition
Potassium appears in a variety of foods ;. When the potassium level increases, consider how much potassium you receive each day in your diet. High potassium foods include avocados, asparagus, tomatoes, spinach, lima beans, carrots, bananas, peaches, apricots, dandelion leaves, lamb and roast beef. Low-sodium varieties of salt is becoming more common in supermarkets and health food stores as well, and many of these contain very high amounts of potassium. Supplements can sometimes contain moderate doses of potassium as well; check them before adding them to your diet
kidney problems
The kidneys maintain a healthy balance of potassium in the body, excreting matter potassium body does not need. through urine. Kidney disease-where they can not perform its function-constitute the most common cause of too much potassium. Conditions that may cause this include kidney infection, kidney failure and blockage of the urinary tract by kidney or bladder stones. All of these conditions require immediate medical attention
Addison’s disease
The adrenals are small bodies placed on top of each kidney ;. Separates a hormone called aldosterone that controls the balance of sodium and potassium in the body. If for any reason the adrenal glands stop secreting aldosterone, the kidneys stop excreting potassium and blood potassium levels will rise. Addison’s disease, where adrenal stop producing aldosterone and cortisol (possibly due to hormonal imbalances or auto-immune problems) can create such conditions. Other symptoms of Addison’s disease include weight loss, fatigue, low blood pressure and darker skin.
trauma
Although relatively uncommon, acute trauma or bleeding can release potassium in increased levels in the blood. Potassium may increase as a result of burns, bruises, cuts, blood transfusions, surgery, internal bleeding and rhabdomyolysis (destruction of muscle due to alcoholism or drug abuse). If you experience any of these injuries, so ask your doctor to check for high levels of potassium in the blood.

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