Public Health Risks Of Rapid Weight Loss

Public Health Risks Of Rapid Weight Loss

So you’ve just lost a bunch of weight, very fast, and is extremely proud of yourself. The only problem is rapid weight loss may come back to bite you. You might have been better to lose it slowly
serious risk
Ideally, an individual should lose more than 1 to 2 pounds a week. At this rate, it is more likely to keep weight off and not put yourself at risk for serious side effects that can accompany rapid weight loss, according Caloriesperhour. com and an article written by Megan Porter, RD. If you fall a bunch of weight in a short period of time, you are putting yourself at risk for a heart arrhythmia, gallstones, electrolyte imbalance and gallstones imbalances, high or low blood pressure and changes in blood sugar levels. Some of these outcomes can be life threatening.
Your Brain think you’re Starving
If you’re practically starving yourself in an attempt to lose weight quickly, you may find that you start overeating because your body releases neurotransmitters that causes you to eat more than you need to satisfy hunger.
Brain function has a lot to do with weight loss. If you do not eat at all, your brain is going to change your calorie storage because it thinks you are starving. So even if you initially releasing massive amounts of weight, the weight is probably going to pile in as fast as you lost it because you do not burn calories as you normally would via brain instructions. Your brain has gone into protective mode, and protects you against perceived hunger. When a brain instructs the body to go into calorie-saving, calories are converted to fat. If a brain is in safe mode, and do not believe the body is threatened by hunger, it will go in calorie losing mode.
Metabolism Slows
Your body metabolism will slow down if your body has been deprived of calories. Again, as mentioned above, minds and bodies in action if they think they are starving. After the initial weight loss, your metabolism will slow to a crawl and you’re going to have a hard time keeping the weight off because you burn very few calories at this point, according to Public Health Forum. com. It takes a while for your metabolism to speed up again so that in the interval if you start eating more, weight is going to pile in.
Eating Disorders May Result
Changing Shape. com maintains that rapid weight loss can lead to an eating disorder, because the food cravings become so great that you end up bingeing followed by purging (vomiting), called bulimia, because you feel guilty about screwing up your diet. It is possible that rapid weight loss can lead to anorexia, a condition where a person literally starving themselves, often to death.
gallstones
If you lose weight too quickly, and then get it back, and then lose it again, you are at risk of getting gallstones, according to Win. NIDDK. nih. gov (See Additional Resources). The more weight that is lost and then regained further increase your chances of developing gallstones. This is called weight cycling. Although the medical community is not quite sure why weight cycling resulting in gallstone may be due to the increase in cholesterol levels during the losing phase of the cycle.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *